submit news    HOME | FEEDBACK  


« NAVIGATION »
NEWS

- Bio/Medicine

- Chemicals

- Defense

- Drug Delivery

- Education

- Electronics

- Energy

- Events

- Grants

- Industry

- Investment

- Litigation

- Materials

- MEMS

- Nanofabrication

- Nanoparticles

- Nanotubes

- Optics

- Partnership

- Patent

- Products

- Quantum dots

- Research

- Smart Dust

- Software
COMPANIES
EVENTS

- Browse by Month

- Current Shows

- Previous Shows

- Submit Events
FEEDBACK
ADVERTISE
LINK TO US

« PARTNERS »
Become A Nanotechwire Partner

FEI Company

Veeco Instruments

Nano Science and Technology Institute

National Nanotechnology Initiative

Nanotechnology at Zyvex

Want to see your Company or Organization listed above? Become A Nanotechwire Partner Today - click here
« NEWSLETTER »



« SEARCH »







10/19/2009 6:05:58 PM
Argonne scientists find new set of multiferroic materials

The trail to a new multiferroic started with the theories of a U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory scientist and ended with a multidisciplinary collaboration that created a material with potential impact on next generation electronics.

Argonne scientist Craig Fennie's principles of microscopic materials design predicted that the high pressure form of FeTiO3 would have both weak ferromagnetism and ferroelectric polarization, an unusual combination in a single material.

"We were able to take the theory and, through targeted synthesis and measurement, prove that FeTiO3 has both weak ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity, just as Craig predicted," Argonne scientist John Mitchell said. "Success in this materials design and discovery project would not have been possible without a collaborative team involving several disciplines and talents from across the lab and indeed the country."

Scientists from Argonne's materials science division and Center for Nanoscale Materials along with scientists from Pennsylvania State University, University of Chicago and Cornell University used piezoresponse force microscopy, optical second harmonic generation and magnetometry to show ferroelectricity at and below room temperature and weak ferromagnetism below 120 Kelvin for polycrystalline FeTiO3 synthesized at high pressure.

Multiferroic materials show both magnetism and polar order, which are seemingly contradictory properties. Magnetic ferroelectrics may have applications in memory, sensors, actuators and other multifunctional devices by acting as magnetic switches when their electric fields are reversed.

This project was recently published in Physical Review Letters and will be featured in the upcoming Advanced Photon Source annual report.

Funding for this research was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science.

Other Headlines from Argonne National Laboratory ...
 - Nanoparticles help scientists harvest light with solar fuels
 - Argonne Researcher named top-5 materials scientist of 2000s
 - Scientists use light to join nanoparticles into new materials
 - Argonne, Envia strike deal to license advanced battery technology
 - Argonne battery technology helps power Chevy Volt

More Materials Headlines ...
 - Evidence for Graphene-Sheet-Driven Superconducting State in Graphite Intercalation Compounds
 - Miracle Material
 - UT physicist accelerates simulations of thin film growth
 - New form of girl's best friend is lighter than ever
 - Improved Electrical Conductivity in Polymeric Composites


« Back To List »

« GET LISTED »
- submit company
- submit news
- submit events
- advertise here

« EVENTS »
- More Events


Copyright � 2017 Nanotechwire.com | Privacy Policy |