submit news    HOME | FEEDBACK  


« NAVIGATION »
NEWS

- Bio/Medicine

- Chemicals

- Defense

- Drug Delivery

- Education

- Electronics

- Energy

- Events

- Grants

- Industry

- Investment

- Litigation

- Materials

- MEMS

- Nanofabrication

- Nanoparticles

- Nanotubes

- Optics

- Partnership

- Patent

- Products

- Quantum dots

- Research

- Smart Dust

- Software
COMPANIES
EVENTS

- Browse by Month

- Current Shows

- Previous Shows

- Submit Events
FEEDBACK
ADVERTISE
LINK TO US

« PARTNERS »
Become A Nanotechwire Partner

FEI Company

Veeco Instruments

Nano Science and Technology Institute

National Nanotechnology Initiative

Nanotechnology at Zyvex

Want to see your Company or Organization listed above? Become A Nanotechwire Partner Today - click here
« NEWSLETTER »



« SEARCH »







3/5/2010 7:42:55 AM
Semiconductor Research Corporation and Researchers from Arizona Universities Develop Sensor to Drastically Cut Water Usage During Chip Making Process

Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), the world's leading university-research consortium for semiconductors and related technologies, University of Arizona and Arizona State University researchers have shown a new, exclusive way to dramatically conserve the amount of water needed to manufacture semiconductors. Using a unique device called Electro-Chemical Residue Sensor (ECRS), it allows for clean, rinse and dry process optimization that helps make semiconductor facilities more efficient, sustainable and cost-effective.

Water conservation in semiconductor facilities is becoming a major concern for integrated device manufacturers (IDM), as the costs, availability, and sustainability of water resources can greatly affect manufacturing facilities. Approximately 80 percent1 of water consumed by semiconductor sites is used in the rinsing of the wafer during various stages of device fabrication. Additionally, a wafer going through a modern semiconductor process is rinsed roughly 400 times, according to industry experts.

“The use of water resources are getting increasingly more critical especially as the industry moves to smaller features and approaches nano-scale manufacturing technologies,” said Dr. Bert Vermeire, associate professor of research at Arizona State University. “A main reason for high water usage is inadequate process monitoring, which can be attributed to the lack of appropriate monitoring tools. One cannot optimize what one cannot measure.”

ECRS addresses this measurement challenge by dynamically assessing a wafer’s cleanliness during the clean, rinse and dry cycles. A comprehensive simulation model estimates residual impurity concentrations from the measured results. No other sensor of this type is available today.

“Tests performed in collaboration with an IDM’s large integrated circuit manufacturing facility demonstrated this sensor’s capability to detect chemicals inside features, showing annual water savings of up to 50 percent could be realized by optimizing the rinse process using the ECRS,” said Dan Herr, SRC director of Nanomanufacturing Sciences.

The fundamental science for the ECRS was developed at the University of Arizona's Engineering Research Center for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing with support and mentoring from SRC. Environmental Metrology Corporation was spun off from this center in 2003 to commercialize the sensor. A prototype was designed, built and tested under the National Science Foundation’s Small Business Innovation Research program. Environmental Metrology Corporation was also awarded a 2009 Editors’ Choice Best Product Award from Semiconductor International for the ECRS.

A wireless version of the sensor is being jointly developed by Environmental Metrology Corporation and the ConnectionOne Industry-University Research Center located at Arizona State University.

Celebrating 27 years of collaborative research for the semiconductor industry, SRC defines industry needs, invests in and manages the research that gives its members a competitive advantage in the dynamic global marketplace. Awarded the National Medal of Technology, America’s highest recognition for contributions to technology, SRC expands the industry knowledge base and attracts premier students to help innovate and transfer semiconductor technology to the commercial industry. For more information, visit http://www.src.org.

Other Headlines from SRC ...
 - Semiconductor Research Corporation and University of North Texas Establish Center to Focus on Advanced Plasma Processes and Insulators Used in Semiconductor Manufacturing
 - Semiconductor Research Corporation and Researchers from Arizona Universities Develop Sensor to Drastically Cut Water Usage During Chip Making Process
 - Semiconductor Research Corporation and Stanford University Demonstrate Advance That Could Extend Life of Cost-Effective Semiconductor Manufacturing
 - Semiconductor Research Corporation and Intel Foundation Partner to Prepare Future Innovators with Use-Inspired Research Program
 - Semiconductor Research Corporation and University of Arizona Researchers Advance Peridynamic Theory Research to Help Make Electronics More Reliable

More Industry Headlines ...
 - UCF Researcher Gets Global Attention, Cash
 - Scott Gish joins Cambridge NanoTech Executive Team
 - Ultratech Announces HB-LED Asia Technology Center in Taiwan
 - Luna Innovations Reports First Quarter 2011 Financial Results
 - CVD Equipment Corporation Announces Record Q1 Results


« Back To List »

« GET LISTED »
- submit company
- submit news
- submit events
- advertise here

« EVENTS »
- More Events


Copyright © 2014 Nanotechwire.com | Privacy Policy |